Women’s Equality Day: 95 Years Ago Women Were Granted The Right To Vote, Today Women Of Color Are An Extremely Important Voting Bloc

civilrightsactivist:

ERA words button

The ERA: Equal Rights Amendment to the US Constitution First introduced by Alice Paul in 1923 after women were given the right to vote in the US Constitution in 1920. It needs three more state to ratify it before will be included fully recognized in our Constitution.

Women were granted the right to vote 95 years ago. We are still waiting for passage of the Equal Right  Amendment that was first introduced in 1923. Meanwhile here’s some info on the positive impact of what the 19th Amendment did for women, particularly women of color.

Originally posted on Central Oregon Coast NOW:

Aug 26, 2015 | By CAP Action War Room

Today marks 95 years since the certification of the 19th amendment, which granted women access to vote. In recognition of the historic achievement, President Obama declared today Women’s Equality Day. Women’s Equality Day recognizes all the ways that persisting gender inequality affects women today, from the gender wage gap to equal access to the ballot box.

A new analysis by the Center for American Progress looked at the influential role women—especially women of color—play in our elections. The 19th Amendment paved the way for women to vote, but until the Voting Rights Act was enacted in 1965, many women of color were still prohibited from voting. But in the relatively short amount of time since then, even amidst attacks on voting rights at the national and state level, women of color have become an incredibly influential voting bloc.

Here are…

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the word '"racism" embedded in circle with a slash through it.

Racial Lenses

the word '

End Racism Now

White privilege.  It’s a system that is embedded in our culture “to overempower certain groups. Such privilege simply confers dominance because of one’s race [white/Caucasian] or sex [male]”.

In looking and thinking about white privilege, I periodically read other civil rights bloggers to see what that have to say on the issue of white privilege, racial inequities, and how people of all races and ethnicities view the world.  One of these bloggers had a link to a new person [to me]; Glenn Robinson is this “new” blogger. He writes about mixed cultures, mixed heritages, and mixed identities in what I believe is an effort to speak the truth about other views of our world in an effort to help break down some of the barriers that white privilege creates.

Glenn maintains several different civil-rights based blogs. Topics range from Amerindian issues [500 Nations], to immigration and multiculturalism [Community Village], to views about mixed cultural heritage [Mixed American Life], to systemic oppression, violence, and disenfranchisement [Oppression Monitor].

The blog that initially caught my eye is called Mixed American Life.  And the article that I first honed in on is called Racial Lenses.  Here are a couple of excerpts from this blog.  If you are interested in more of his work, please check it out. I’m impressed. I hope you are too.

What is a racial lens?

A racial lens is what influences how you view the world by way of your own experience, your own racial and ethnic experience. -Glenn Robinson

Xenophobic Racial Lenses

Some ways cultures describe their own color

  • Africans – Black
  • Asians – Gold
  • Chicanos – Bronze
  • Native Americans – Earth tone, Golden
  • Europeans – White, Pink, Red

Mixed Heritage Racial Lens

Bill of Rights for People of Mixed Heritage

I HAVE THE RIGHT…
Not to justify my existence in this world.
Not to keep the races separate within me.
Not to justify my ethnic legitimacy.
Not to be responsible for people’s discomfort with my physical or ethnic ambiguity…. [and more, this is just a start of the list of rights Glenn presents in his blog]

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Artist Shirin Barghi Captures #LASTWORDS Spoken by Black Victims of Police

civilrightsactivist:

Black Lives DO Matter. These last words from the mouths of babes are truly powerful.

Originally posted on The Militant Negro™:

Mr MilitantNegro™ Jueseppi B Mr MilitantNegro™
Jueseppi B

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Eric Garner was arrested in Staten Island on suspicion of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes and placed in a chokehold by NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo. A Staten Island grand jury decided not to indict Pantaleo, despite a coroner reportedly ruling Garner's death a homicide. Eric Garner was arrested in Staten Island on suspicion of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes and placed in a chokehold by NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo. A Staten Island grand jury decided not to indict Pantaleo, despite a coroner reportedly ruling Garner’s death a homicide.

Freddie Gray, 25, died after suffering a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody in Baltimore. Freddie Gray, 25, died after suffering a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody in Baltimore.

"They said they thought McDade was armed because ... he clutched his waste band as they chased him onto a dimly lit neighborhood street." “They said they thought McDade was armed because … he clutched his waste band as they chased him onto a dimly lit neighborhood street.”

Mehserle testified that he meant to zap Grant with his Taser in an Oakland station - but instead pulled his .40 caliber handgun and blasted the man. Mehserle testified that he meant to zap Grant with his Taser in an Oakland station – but instead pulled his .40 caliber handgun and blasted the man.

"She pushed out a back door and ran into the darkness beneath overarching oaks. He lay on the floor near his kitchen, two bullet holes in his chest, blood pooling thick, dying." “She pushed out a back door and ran into the darkness beneath overarching oaks. He lay on the floor near his kitchen, two bullet holes in his chest, blood pooling thick, dying.”

"Diallo was shot outside his Bronx apartment. The police officers had mistaken him for a serial rapist, who was later apprehended." “Diallo was…

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On a stage with no vaginas, there were a lot of opinions about vaginas

civilrightsactivist:

Keep Abortion Legal NOW Round

Keep Abortion Legal NOW Round (http://www.now.org/issues/abortion/)

On Thursday evening, August 6, FOX News aired two sets of GOP presidential debates. From both the questioners and the candidates, there were a lot of opinions about vaginas on both stages by people mostly without vaginas. Also a lot of bullying – of women and of immigrants. Is that the only opinions they have? Sad…

Originally posted on Margaret and Helen:

Margaret, let’s be clear. I am obviously using the term vagina in the narrowest sense of the word as defined by the Republican Party: a noun referring to women. And it was pretty clear at the debate that vaginas have no value unless a baby needs to pass through one on its way to church or its minimum wage job. Of course, if that baby is black or brown, then the intended destination changes to either prison or Mexico respectively.

I don’t pretend to think that any of the presidential candidates will ever read what I write, but if they did I hope they will remember this:

Millions of women have been going to Planned Parenthood for nearly 100 years. We all remember the exceptional care and the quality of the information we received from the staff at those clinics. We remember when Planned Parenthood staff held our hands and…

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Marriage Equality Not for All

civilrightsactivist:

Thanks Nel for highlighting this issue. I did not know that “One segment of the U.S. population not covered by the Supreme Court ruling that legalizes marriage equality is Native Americans living on reservations.

Why? Because Congress or the tribes themselves must make that decision since reservations are sovereign lands and apparently are not under the direct purview of the US Supreme Court.

I’m am pleased however to hear that “many tribes have changed their laws to legalize marriage equality or ruled that they will follow the rules of the state where reservations are located, but ten tribes, including the two largest ones of Cherokee Nation and the Navajo, have acts that prohibit same-gender marriage.

I hope my readers read and then support their Native brothers and sisters in their efforts to gain same-sex gender equality within their tribal nations.

Originally posted on Nel's New Day:

Every month in editing a newsletter for our local PFLAG group, I write articles about national and global news. This past month has been filled with the aftermath—and sometimes backlash—to the Supreme Court decision that LGBT people should have equal rights in marriage. The media frenzy began when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-gender couples should have the right to marry in all 50 states. Here are some of the issues that emerged from that decision.

Of course, conservatives were traumatized by the possibility that LGBT people could get married. Judges refused to marry same-gender couples or said that they were too busy. A Texas judge required everyone who he married, LGBT or straight, to sign a document stating that he was opposed to the decision and that no one should even mention marriage equality in his presence. Some clerks decided to quit rather than issue marriage licenses. One of…

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The Federal State-Based Universal Health Care Waiver Act of 2015

banner picture of Universal Healthcare from http://www.healthcareforallcolorado.org/

One Agenda: Universal Health Care.
Picture courtesy of Healthcare for All Colorado

As part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), states have been given the ability to innovate or create their own form of health care insurance or coverage starting on January 1, 2017 AS LONG AS “benefits are at least as comprehensive and affordable as those offered by Qualified Health Plans available on the Exchanges,” according to Representative Jim McDermott (D-WA-7).

As a result, at least 14 states—California, Colorado, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Missouri, , New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Washington—have community advocates and state legislators working towards implementing a state-level form of universal health care. They have been working for affordable healthcare access for all residents of their states before and since the Affordable Care Act – aka Obamacare – was passed in 2010.

Now that the US Supreme Court has basically settled the fact that the ACA is constitutional both on June 28, 2012 (Florida v. Department of Health and Human Services) and again on June 25, 2015 (King v. Burwell), we can consider ways to improve our healthcare system at both the state and federal level. As a medical doctor and a member of Congress, McDermott voted for the ACA. He also recognizes that “still more needs  to be done to control costs, improve care, and cover everyone.”

One way to further control these costs and improve health care while covering everyone is to create a universal health care system which I’ve previously blogged about (see here, here, here, here, and here). That means we either have the federal government create a federal single payer plan OR we use the waiver clause in the ACA to help states create their own universal single-payer health care program.

Yet even with the waiver currently allowed within the ACA for innovative state-based health care plans, creating a state-based universal care plan that saves funds for states and individuals while providing health care access to all has a big hurdle to overcome. Rep. McDermott explained this issue in a speech on the floor of the House of Representatives on July 28:

One of the many achievements of the Affordable Care Act is its provisions that grant states the authority to innovate in their health care systems. Under Section 1332 of the law, a state may apply for a State Innovation Waiver that will provide it with control of federal dollars that otherwise would have been spent on premium tax credits and cost-sharing reductions for its residents. Through this waiver, a state may design a system to cover its residents, so long as benefits are at least as comprehensive and affordable as those offered by Qualified Health Plans available on the Exchanges.

However, even with this flexibility, numerous barriers limit states’ ability to design true single-payer systems. Existing waivers are narrow in scope, requiring states to seek out imperfect and convoluted solutions to circumvent federal limitations. A sweeping preemption provision in the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) denies states authority to regulate employer-sponsored health plans. And, due to the complexities of our existing federal health programs, it is essentially impossible for a state to design a single benefit package that can be administered simply and efficiently on behalf of all of its residents.

This speech was McDermott’s announcement that he was introducing HR 3241, aka the “State-Based Universal Health Care Act of 2015:” If passed, this bill would allow states to apply for a universal health care waiver that would allow them to have access to and authority over federal health care dollars that would otherwise be spent on the residents of that state. More specifically, this additional waiver act goes beyond the ACA to deal with the hurdles mentioned above. The new provisions of this law, according to McDermott, would waive all of the following:

  • The rules governing premium tax credits and cost-sharing reductions, as provided for in existing waiver authority under Section 1332 of the ACA.

  • Provisions necessary for states to pool funds that otherwise would be spent on behalf of residents enrolled in Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, TRICARE, and the Federal Employee Health Benefits Program.

  • ERISA’s preemption clause, which cur-rently forbids states from enacting legislation relating to employee health benefit program

After the introduction of HR 3241, the House referred this bill to five committees — the Committee on Energy and Commerce, the Committee on Ways and Means, the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the Committee on Armed Services, and the Committee on Education and the Workforce. I believe that the large number of committee referrals was done because of the need to review all of the different laws that this waiver would impact.

You can read the bill in its entirety here.

I am pleased that this bill has been introduced. It however needs many co-sponsors and advocates to pressure Congress to actually hear, review, and pass this legislation. Please contact your US Representative and ask her/him to co-sponsor Representative Jim McDermott, MD’s bill HR 3241. Here’s the lookup page to find your US. Representative by zip code.

As this is the summer, your Representative should be in the home district. Call, write, set up a meeting and tell her/him why you want to see a universal health care program in your state and why this bill is so necessary. If your Representative agrees to sign on, have him/her contact Mr. McDermott’s aides that are focusing on this issue. They are Jayme Shoun, located in Seattle at (206) 553-7170 and Daniel Foster, Health Counsel in the DC Office at (202) 225-3106.

Thanks.

Jeb for President? Part III

civilrightsactivist:

Nel of Nel’s New Day has written several blogs on the 2016 presidential candidates. Most of them have been about the GOP candidates.  I wonder: might this be because the “Grand Old Party” seems to be having a free-for-all?.

Jeb Bush merited three days of her blogging. I reblogged the first two — Number One here and Number Two here — earlier today. Here is the third one.

Originally posted on Nel's New Day:

Jeb cartoon

jeb-bush-logo-hed-2015 with BushJeb (short for John Ellis Bush) Bush is trying to rebrand himself as a new man, a person disconnected from the Bush dynasty, but his logo is old-school, left over from his 1994 unsuccessful run for Florida governor. The lack of last name didn’t go unnoticed. David Frum, former speechwriter for George W. Bush, wrote, “The most important thing about the Jeb logo isn’t the exclamation point that is there. It’s the last name that isn’t there.” At least, the logo is producing a lot of fun about Bush’s declaration of his candidacy.

jeb1 logoIn declaring his candidacy—finally!—Jeb Bush said, “I’ll break away from the GOP pack.” He won’t escape the Bush name, but his personal family scandals show that he’s already separated from the other GOP candidates:

1994: Bush’s eldest son, George P., broke into his ex-girlfriend’s house, fled the father, and then returned to drive his SUV into their…

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Jeb for President? Part II

civilrightsactivist:

Nel of Nel’s New Day has done several blogs on the 2016 presidential candidates. Most of them have been about the GOP candidates (might that be because the “Grand Old Party” seems to be having a free-for-all?).

Jeb Bush merited three days of her blogging. I reblogged the first one earlier today. Here is the second one. e is the And finally, here is the third one.

Originally posted on Nel's New Day:

king bushJeb Bush’s plan for the half of 2015: raise tens of millions of dollars, separate himself from his brother’s presidency, win conservatives, and become the Republican who will win the GOP nomination. Thus far, he’s raised the money. Asked about his brother, he waffles between supporting him and trying to find a way to please people who disagree with George W. Bush’s Iraq War. Conservatives still don’t like him, and he has appeared incompetent through answers to questions and consistent flip-flopping.

Last week he changed his campaign manager to the more negative and conservative Danny Diaz, meaning that Bush may have reconsidered whether he’ll still campaign “joyfully.” Diaz’s participation in Bush II’s campaign is another connection between Jeb and Dubya. One Bush ally said that Diaz will signal that “the culture of the Bush operation will now be a Pickett’s Charge engagement campaign with his main opponents.” Pickett’s Charge on…

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Jeb for President? Part I

civilrightsactivist:

Once again, thanks Nel for blogging on the full spectrum of presidential candidates. I have been traveling since June 14 and am just now getting back to reading my favorite blogs. As I promised on June 13, I am now catching up on the plethora of presidential candidates that have officially announced their candidacy since June 14. I agreed to reblog Nel’s presidential candidate series. As of today, several more Republican candidates have announced their candidacies since June 14l Of these new candidates, Nel has blogged about four of them. In order of their announcements, they are GOP #10 Jeb Bush (June 14), GOP #12 Donald Trump (June 18), GOP #13 Bobby Jindal (June 24), and GOP #14 Chris Christie (June 30).

Jeb Bush merited three days of blogging. Here is the first one.   You can view the second posting here and the third posting here.

Originally posted on Nel's New Day:

The big day has arrived! Everyone knew that former Florida governor Jeb Bush wouldn’t be dashing around the country and coordinating with his Super PAC—something he can’t do after he declares his candidacy—unless he was running for president. Millions of dollars later and on the verge, some people say over the edge, of breaking the law in his campaigning, he’s a bona fide candidate. Here’s what the United States would get with Bush III, as he explains his positions in an opportunistic, passive-aggressive way.

Former Florida Governor and probable 2016 Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush speaks at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Conference in Nashua, New Hampshire April 17, 2015.  REUTERS/Brian Snyder Former Florida Governor and probable 2016 Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush speaks at the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Conference in Nashua, New Hampshire April 17, 2015. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Bush’s Christian belief will guide his governing. That includes supporting the so-called “religious freedom” that merges church and state in laws and courts.

Unmarried women with children should be publicly shamed, according to Bush’s 1995 book, Profiles…

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Sanders Enters Presidential Race

civilrightsactivist:

Thanks Nel for blogging on the full spectrum of presidential candidates. I’ll periodically reblog your postings so that my followers can see who’s on the stump and generally where they stand. This is the second of my reblogs on this topic. Thanks

Originally posted on Nel's New Day:

Some people celebrate May Day today with a pagan celebration of flowers and Maypoles; others recognize it as a day of protest and worker solidarity. That history goes back to 1886 when 200,000 U.S. workers struck for an eight-hour day. On the third day, a Chicago strike at the McCormick Reaper plant became violent as police killed and injured the strikers. The next day’s peaceful meeting at Haymarket Square protesting police action turned even more brutal. As the meeting started to break up, a bomb near the speaker’s wagon wounded 60 policemen and killed another seven. The police wounded 200 civilians and killed several more. Although no one was sure who had committed the crime, four people were executed. No one in the U.S. had an eight-hour day until the United Mine Workers in 1898; a federal law mandating the eight-hour day wasn’t passed until 1938.

The international holiday for labor, created in…

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