Peter Buckland’s remarks at the “No to Nestlé” forum

Concerns about Nestlé Waters, a large multi-national corporation, creating a plastic water bottling plant in Centre County along Spring Creek are heating up.

From my reading of the Forum, there appeared to be general concerns of corporatocracy and regulatory capture. Corporatocracy is defined as  “a society or system that is governed or controlled by corporations.”

Regulatory capture is more complicated.  According to Emory Law, regulatory capture is not illegal acts, corruption or control over governments. Instead,

Regulatory capture is characterized by the regulator’s attitude, not the regulated entity’s actions. A regulator is “captured” when he is in a constant state of “being persuaded”: persuaded based on a persuader’s identity rather than an argument’s merits. Regulatory capture is reflected in a surplus of passivity and reactivity, and a deficit of curiosity and creativity. It is evidenced by a body of commission decisions or non-decisions—about resources, procedures, priorities, and policies, where what the regulated entity wants has more influence than what the public interest requires….

If regulatory capture is a state of being, assisted and sustained by the captive, what roles are played by others? Regulatory capture is enabled by those who ignore it, tolerate it, accept it or encourage it: … feed[ing] a forest where private interest trees grow tall, while the public’s needs stay small.

 

Issues of lack of governmental transparency, water extraction, costs, and many other concerns have been raised at the “No to Nestlé” forum on March 14, 2018, in letters to the editor, on Facebook, and at the public forum held by Nestle on March 12, 2018.

This speech by Peter Buckland was given at a community “No to Nestlé” forum on March 14, 2018. It presents his concerns about lack of governmental transparency that may have resulted from actions related to what could be considered as regulatory capture by a large multi-national corporation.

Peter is in the Forest

The No to Nestle forum was held on March 14th at CPI. Thank you to the individuals who brought this together, the staff at CPI who helped them set up the meeting, and the organizations who were present: the newly-formed Concerned Citizens of Pleasant Gap, Clearwater Conservancy, Food and Water Watch, Nittany Valley Environmental Coalition, Sierra Club Moshannon, and Trout Unlimited. You can watch a video of resident Courtney Morris speaking and read coverage in the CDT. More to come. My remarks (without some ad lib elaborations) are below.

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NO TO NESTLE BATHTUB Picture courtesy of Meg Weidenhof

Thanks for being here tonight. My name is Peter Buckland. I’m a lifetime Pennsylvanian. My first home was on Purdue Mountain but I’ve lived most of my years in the Centre Region where I’ve been active on community and environmental issues. I also serve in local government. Whatever I say tonight, I need to…

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Nestle doesn’t care about communities. We do.

The Spring Creek Watershed Commission is planning on holding a public forum on Nestle’s bottling plant being considered for location in Spring and Benner Townships here in Centre County, PA. Time and place for this forum have yet to be determined. The Commission can’t take sides on this issue but they can provide a platform for the public to air their concerns/support on both sides of this issue.

I’ll add a comment re time and place of the public forum once that is set up.

Peter is in the Forest

The people of Spring and Benner Townships have a difficult decision to make. Should the Nestle Corporation be allowed to build a bottling plant that would extract over 400,000 of gallons of water from the aquifer each day and sell it in single-use plastic bottles? The importance of this decision can’t be overstated. Given the public relations blitz the Chamber of Business and Industry of Centre County has put out there on Nestle’s behalf, I think we need to take a look behind the curtain.

According to Forbes, Nestle was worth just shy of $230 billion last year. They are among the world’s largest food and water companies. That monetary worth, though, has come at tremendous costs to communities across the United States.

On the arid Morongo Band of Mission Indians’ reservation in Cabazon, California, Nestle has continued to pump water during a record-setting drought. The tribe has little to no data to…

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The hydra returns as the Toll Brothers win in Commonwealth Court

This is a cautionary tale from a township just south of where I live. FYI, the Slab Cabin Run that is mentioned below feeds into Spring Creek which runs right through Bellefonte where I live.

Peter is in the Forest

map_of_ferguson_township2c_centre_county2c_pennsylvania_highlighted Ferguson Township, depicted in red, is a Home Rule municipality in southern Centre County. We are about 18,000 people on about 50 square miles of mixed urban, suburban, agricultural, and forested land. The Cottages development discussed in this post would be located along the central eastern border of the township with State College borough. Image courtesy of Wikimedia.

As you may know, a Centre County Court of Common Pleas judge’s ordered that a lower court decision be vacated regarding The Cottages, a Toll Brothers development in Ferguson Township where I’m a supervisor. The original lower court decision found that the previous board had “committed an error of law” in regard to the planned residential development (PRD) plan for the Cottages in November 2015.

As the Centre Daily Times reports, “A group of residents filed an appeal against the board” and Judge Grine ruled last July that the supervisors had “committed an error of law…

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